Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture

Seagrape House is a 3,000-square-foot home designed by Traction Architecture. It is located in Anna Maria, Florida, USA, and was completed in 2013.  This is a house in Florida, USA that is more than meets the eye.  At first you see the front of the structure, and you say to yourself, “Alright, that house is fairly well built.”  However, nothing jumps out at you.  That’s why you must explore the inside of the building to fully understand it’s greatness.

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (18)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (16)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (17)

For instance, if this were the picture that RareDelights were to have used, you wouldn’t have clicked on it.

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (15)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (14)

However, this is a view where the house really begins to entice you into thinking, “This home could be even more than what I could have imagined.”

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (13)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (12)

With multiple balconies, this house is sure to please the owners and any guests they may have with a view of the ocean and surrounding landscape. Watching the storm roll in over the ocean at dusk must be a beautiful sight here.

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (11)

The use of a mileage display is well used here, and makes it seem as though the home has history.  It gives you the sense of your geological location, which is just a really nice feature of the home.  Simple things like this can really give a home a certain personality that some people are really looking for in a home.

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (10)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (9)

An open floor plan with smoothed concrete creates a modern/industrial feel to the home in a location with very few homes that consider this model of design. Normally you can only find gems like this in high rise buildings or in different countries altogether.

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (8)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (7)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (6)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (5)

Skylights are always nice in a home.

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (4)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (3)

The use of windows in this home is most likely the most prominent feature when considering this home in Florida for purchase. It allows one to see outside while living his or her lives inside.  This may seem like a tame option or feature, but this has impactful effects on those who would call this place home. It helps you still feel like you’re a part of your environment, and this reinforces environmental responsibility. Not only that, but it just looks so damn cool! This would be the perfect desk to work at.

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (2)

Seagrape House in Florida, USA by Traction Architecture (1)

Overall, a very lovely home.  And it’s eco-friendly!

Seagrape House by Traction Architecture:

“The Seagrape House is a weekend retreat on the Gulf of Mexico. Situated on a barrier island, the shape of the site shifts with each passing storm. During the course of the project, dunes emerged and multiplied, and the distance between the house and the coastline more than doubled. We conceived of the house as a physical anchor along the blurred edge between land and sea, a tool to understand the landscape and one’s place within it.
Permanence is expressed by selectively exposing the home’s poured concrete construction which resists hurricane forces and enables dramatic cantilevers. Livable spaces are elevated on concrete columns to protect the home from storm surge and to allow the dune vegetation to meander below.

A megaphone-shaped deck is subtracted from the volume of the building to amplify the sound of crashing waves. Small details, such as an aluminum line inlaid into the concrete floor orient you due West, and carvings in the cypress wall cladding triangulate your position across the Gulf of Mexico to Tulum and Veracruz, a nod to distant civilizations. A time capsule containing family mementos was cast into the concrete shear wall, reinforcing the notion of the house as a constant as time passes and children grow.

The home’s wedge-shaped form was derived from the desire to achieve both volumetric and thermal efficiency while maximizing views of the Gulf. Bedrooms were envisioned as spaces of quiet respite with cypress built-ins that frame the sea to promote contemplative study.

Photovoltaic panels provide the bulk of the home’s energy needs. The Seagrape House is the first LEED Platinum certified home on Anna Maria Island.”

To see more work from the designers, go to their website.

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